Large mining tires expand Maxam’s range

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The latest specialty products to join Maxam Tire’s line-up are the new or improved MS401, MS402, MS403 haulage tires for mining applications.

Maxam’s new Large Mining product line is said to be the result of extensive research and testing in multiple mine locations across several continents and builds on the experience of the MS402, which has been continuously improved since its debut in 2009.

“Each item is stringently tested on our 5m wheel in the lab prior to release for field testing,” said Dirk Debruin, director of engineering. “Field testing commences only after lab test requirements have been met and remains ongoing, with Maxam field engineers continually tracking and benchmarking our product against the best in service.”

In order to meet the toughest application requirements, the new haulage tires utilize newly developed compounding and carcass construction.

“Continuous research driven by lab and field validation has enabled improvements to be made in process and materials to optimize our Maxam construction and compound,” said Debruin. The improvements are claimed to enable the Large Mining products to provide the best delivered value, greatest productivity and lowest cost per ton value of operation.

Available for haul trucks up to 320 tons, Maxam offers three specific tread patterns available in multiple compounds based on site ton kilometer/mile per hour (TKPH/TMPH) to meet different surface-mine application requirements.

The MS401 features an aggressive tread design with heat-resistant under-tread, designed for applications that require maximum traction and high site TKPH/TMPH. The MS402 features enhanced shoulder lugs and a solid centerline providing increased protection, traction and tread life in haulage applications. The MS403 integrates an advanced tread design for flexibility in all applications, from smooth haul roads, to rough and rocky terrain.

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Based in Calgary, Alberta, Graham is a former editor of Tire Technology International. Now working freelance, his other outlets include Autocar, Professional Motorsport World, TractionLife.com and Autosphere.ca. He’s a member of the Automobile Journalists Association of Canada (AJAC), the Guild of Motoring Writers and the Motor Press Guild.

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