World natural rubber production falls in 2019, according to ANRPC

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Dr Nguyen Ngoc Bich, secretary general of the Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries, has said that based on preliminary estimates, world production of natural rubber registered a fall of 6.5% to 4.930 million metric tons during the first five months of 2019, on a year-to-year basis. World consumption was 5.789 million metric tons, up 0.9% from 5.376 million metric tons during the same period last year. A favorable market has kept the sentiment in the natural rubber market strong, despite the tension between China and the USA.

The Association of Natural Rubber Producing Countries (ANRPC) will be hosting its 12th Annual Rubber Conference on October 7, 2019. The Government of Indonesia is hosting the conference in Hotel Tentrem, Yogyakarta. Focused on the theme, ‘Adaptive and inclusive path to a sustainable value chain’, the program for the conference is structured into a keynote speech, five talks and a panel discussion represented by key policy makers in the NR sector in the 13 ANRPC member countries, which are Thailand, Indonesia, Vietnam, China, India, Malaysia, Cambodia, Myanmar, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Papua New Guinea and Singapore.

The event is expected to have around 350 participants from about 20 countries, representing farmers, farmer cooperatives, processors, traders, end-users, policy makers, researchers, rubber associations, investment banks, hedge funds and the media.

For further details contact the ANRPC at anrpc.secretariat@gmail.com.

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Rachel's career in journalism began around five years ago when she started working for UKi Media & Events, having recently graduated from Coventry University where she studied the subject. Her favourite aspect of the job is interviewing industry experts, including researchers, scientists, engineers and technicians, and learning more about the ground-breaking technologies and innovations that are shaping the future of the automotive and tire industries.

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